Hair Color for Naturalists

madison-reed-hair-colorOne subject that I am always hearing about is whether or not to color your grays when they start springing up with more consistency. While this is not yet a concern for me, I know that it’s right around the corner and I decided to start fretting about it early (one of the many side effects of having generalized anxiety disorder — we get worrying done ahead of time!) My concerns are as follows:

  1. I am all about being natural, and I don’t really want to feel as though I have to alter something to such an extent to feel good about myself. What’s wrong with some grays? Also, I live in Brooklyn where women younger than me sport silver locks and look great. But am I personally ready to be as self-assuredly cool as they are?
  2. I had always planned on using henna dyes, as they are natural, but I’ve been told by multiple people that they do not work on grays.
  3. Chemicals are scary y’all, and no I’m not an idiot that screams and runs away from anything with words I can’t pronounce in the ingredients list — I know that chemical compounds are a part of natural life, etc. But just the smell of those hair dyes, it just can’t be good, right?
  4. Animal testing. I’m a pescatarian so I don’t have any huge moral ground to stand on, but I really truly hate the idea of animal testing without utmost gain (like finding cancer cures, etc.) I am also an animal rescuer, and something about rescuing one animal to kill another for cosmetics doesn’t sit right.

That’s about enough to keep me up at night, so let’s stop while we’re still ahead shall we? I decided to do something as simple as googling “natural hair color products” and pulled up this custom color brand called Madison Reed. They claim to leave out the “bad stuff” and do not participate in animal testing. However, are the ingredients really body-safe? We are putting this on our HEADS, after all. And does it work? Are you willing to be my guinea pig (hehe)?

If you have any suggestions as to coloring techniques, or if you yourself have wrestled with this quandary, please speak up in the comments!

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The Oil Treatment to End All

Hey folks! Well, we are in the final countdown to my much-anticipated wedding. It’s this Sunday and I will have a full report for you, along with pics of my hair style. I’m heading over to Arté Salon today to practice the style one more time with Amy, and then I’m on my own. She doesn’t do wedding hair, but has been practicing with me so that I can feel more confident doing it myself up in the mountains on the big day. I was reassured recently that I’m doing the right thing by styling my own hair at the wedding — no one has ever given me a fancy hairstyle that I like. Gotta take it into my own hands!

Image courtesy of NaturallyCurly.com

Image courtesy of NaturallyCurly.com

Before we get to all that, of course I have also been prepping my hair for the grand occasion. This includes split end trims (done in my bathroom at home, of course) and lots of conditioning, but most importantly, I’ve been going to Bliss Spa (Soho, NYC) for face and body treatments and I always add my favorite indulgence — Hair Dew. It is by far the very best hair treatment that I’ve ever had. The good news is, I’ve slowly broken down my treatment specialists and I HAVE THE RECIPE! It’s not expensive to get it done at Bliss, it’s about $35, so I highly recommend it if you ever go because they do a nice head massage. However, you can only get it as an add-on to other (more expensive) services.

The alternative is to buy the expensive ingredients and do it at home yourself as you wish. I’ll leave that decision up to you. But suffice it to say, this is the best oil treatment I’ve ever had! It has a balancing oil for your scalp (extra helpful if you tend to have a dry or itchy scalp) and amazing botanicals for the hair. This is A+ stuff, baby. So without further ado…

Ingredients:

Phyto Botanical Scalp Treatment

Phytocitrus Color Protect Radiance Mask

Phytosesame Hydrating Cream for Dry Hair

Procedure:

Start with dry hair, and it doesn’t matter how clean or greasy it is. First apply the Scalp Treatment. This comes with a pipette which is used to apply the stuff directly to your scalp. Use one full pipette per treatment. Place tip directly on scalp at varied locations and squeeze some out in each spot. My experience has been 7-8 sites on the scalp works best. Next, apply the Radiance Mask throughout hair. Lastly, apply the Hydrating Cream to the ends. Experiment with how much you use, based on hair length and thickness, but err on the less-is-more side since this stuff is $$$.

Once all has been applied, rub your scalp and give yourself a nice massage. If your hair is long or not staying put with all that cream in it, tie it up with an elastic band (alternatively — a less harsh tie that works well is the ends of sleeves on old t-shirts. Just cut them off in inch-thick strips and you have a round elasticy-but-soft hair tie.) Put on a shower cap or tie a plastic bag over your hair if you’re on a budg or like to upcycle. If you’re super attentive, put a heated cap or hot towel over your hair to open pores for better absorption. Let this whole thing sit for 20-30 minutes. You may also decide to sleep with the treatment on, which is what I do. Up to you! Take the heated cap or towel off before sleeping and tie a bandana or old scarf over your shower cap to keep it on straight and avoid staining sheets and pillows.

Wash out the whole mixture with 4 tablespoons lemon juice and equal parts conditioner, massaging into scalp. I’d suggest your least expensive conditioner for this step since it’s not in your hair for long, and its main purpose is to tone down the acidity in the lemon juice. Note: This will not make your hair blonde because you will thoroughly wash it out immediately after applying. Think of it as a shampoo. Do not leave it on for more than a few minutes.

Enjoy!

Voila! Your hair will be silky and amazing. I do this maybe a few times a year since it’s so expensive and is a lot of work. I’d suggest doing it a few days before any big event. Your hair has never been so shiny, believe me! One final note: Do not shy away from products that are for color-treated or very damaged hair even if yours is not. These just have more concentrated amounts of the good stuff and your hair will absorb it just as much as damaged strands. If you are ever choosing between two similar conditioning products and one is for damaged hair while one is for normal/dry, go for damaged.

Visit NaturallyCurly.com for more hair oil ideas!

In the name o3E2EBF0257E4D537FA90FA_Largef treatments and laughs, a tribute to one of America’s sweethearts. Thanks for everything you’ve contributed, Mr. Williams. You will be always be remembered. Who could forget the pie treatment mask?

 

 

Winter Hair Woes: Solved!

imagesWinter really is a b*^&% on curly hair, isn’t it? Every single year I debate cutting it all off or straightening it. This year I’m growing it out for my wedding so I can’t do the former, and I get it all sweaty with my workouts so spending $40 on a decent blow-out is not worth it.

There are some important things that we can do to help our curls, but they come with a few snarls. Here’s how to overcome them for happy, healthy hair!

1) Frequent oil treatments.

olive-oil_sq-e4b656991b973d6de22fb74a05922bb0650e9e5a-s6-c30The Problem: If you do an oil treatment every week during the winter you will love your hair. There are just a few issues, namely the plumbing and the time. With shorter daylight hours we find less energy to do the things we have to do, let alone the things we want to do. Aside from time, which would be easy enough to overcome, I have to add to the fact that I live in a pre-war building with less than stellar plumbing and every single time I do an oil treatment it clogs the shower drain. We’ve have to use Drain-O in our already old and unreliable pipes, and that’s not good.

The Solution: I have decided to do bi-weekly oil treatments and to wash them out at the gym instead of at home. Their brand new building and commercial pipes will allow for easy flow. Exercising with an oil treatment in your hair is always recommended, just don’t put in so much that your hair will be dripping, and limit yourself to the treadmill, elliptical, stairs and free weights, or activities where the head doesn’t have to touch machines. Sweating opens pores and allows for additional saturation to your scalp and hair follicles. Apply the treatment the night before so hair has had time to absorb most of it, then tie it in a tight bun and go to the gym, and wash it out when you’re done! Be sure to pack your lemon/conditioner mix for cleansing. In between treatments, apply lighter oils to your ends.

2) A hat to protect hair from the elements.

The Problem: Almost every winter hat is expressly made for straight-haired people. It tamps hair down and flattens the heck out of the top, leaving the bottom frizzy and unmanageable from exposure and friction against scarves and high-necked jackets and sweaters.

montera-newThe Solution: The slouchy trend has brought about a plethora loose-fitting yet flattering hats. To protect hair you can wrap it lightly in a loose silk or nylon bandana before putting the hat on, but you don’t have to. You can also loosely tie hair up on top of your head to keep it covered. Hat styles that work best are those that are semi-loose around the band, and balloon out on top to accommodate lots of hair. I love the hat that I got from a Caribbean market in my neighborhood, loose enough to cover a head full of dreads. There is also a smaller and more discreet version for people with less hair, which can be found in many mall kiosks and online. I’d recommend buying one in person so you can ensure that the band won’t be too tight around your head.

Click below for more ideas to make it through the long, cold winter. Above all, keep your chin up and remember that things may look a bit different, but you’re beautiful all 365 days of the year!

Read More:
Winter Shminter: Curls in the Cooler Months
Winter Hair Care
My Waterless Week
Scalp Care

Mud Runners Beware!

Can you spot my slight update to the Mudderella logo?

Can you spot my slight update to the Mudderella logo?

On Saturday I ran in a Warrior Dash with some friends. You’ve heard of mud runs by now if you live in the USA, and possibly even if not — it’s the newest way to showcase your crazy. They are races that involve a variety of insane obstacles such as barbed wire to crawl under, junk cars to jump over, fire to hop, walls to scale, lakes to swim, rocks to run over, and much more. I swore that I’d never partake in such a thing, but my decision was quickly reversed when I saw how many people have taken part in the trend, how much fun they’ve had, and that there are “lite” versions for those of us who do not consider ourselves “runners.” I am very physically active in many ways, but I’ve always struggled with running. Regardless of whether you go with a Warrior Dash, a Mudderella, or the full-scale Tough Mudder, one thing remains the same: You will get covered in mud.

For, as the genre name suggests, the main trait that ties all of these runs together is racing through the mud like a damned fool. Naturally my first thought was, “But what about my hair?” Now again, I am no scientist, but I know that mud has the ability to extract dirt from pores and possibly even venom from some vermin bites, so I can only imagine what kind of drying effect it might have on hair if left on too long.

Me on the left: Notice, no one can tell how greased-up my hair is! Who cares!

Me on the left: Notice, no one can tell how greased-up my hair is! Who cares!

I prefer to go at life with a proactive approach, so I decided to coat my hair with a ton of conditioner just before taking off, and covered my hair with an old bandana. My first inclination was to put on a shower cap and tie that on with a bandana, but I realized I’d look even more crazy and the thing would probably fall off anyway. Conditioner acts as a shield in all kinds of climates; it absorbs into the “pores” of your hair, saturating it to protect against humidity and dry weather. So wouldn’t it help the mud to slick right off? One would assume so.

Muddy_Mudskipper

Muddy Mud Skipper of Ren & Stimpy fame, for anyone else who grew up in the 90’s!

When I returned home, I rinsed my hair thoroughly, not to mention the rest of myself, and applied one of my favorite conditioning masks overnight. The next morning I washed it all out with lemon juice and conditioner, and it looked and felt like nothing had ever happened.

Problem solved! So now you have no excuses — if you’re healthy, in decent shape, and can find a mud run nearby, go for it. Just be very careful my muddy mudskippers, and know that you can always walk right by any obstacles that are too scary!